New Work By Susan Burnstine

Catherine Couturier Gallery is excited to announce that gallery artist Susan Burnstine has officially released new images from a brand new body of work titled Where Shadows Cease. While she is still portraying her dream-like visions using handmade film cameras, she is now introducing the element of color to her work for the very first time. Please take a moment to view and enjoy this collection of newly released photographs.

 

                                   Where Shadows Cease

 

Susan Burstine, Southbound

Southbound
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burstine, Daybreak Grant Street

Daybreak Grant St.
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burstine, Into the Headlands

Into the Headlands
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burnstine, Rain Over Abiquiu

Rain Over Abiquiu
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Bursntine, Across S.R. 154

Across S.R. 154
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burnstine, East of State St.

East of State St.
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burnstine, Departure

Departure
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Suan Burnstine, Lost Highway

Lost Highway
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burnstine, Across Old Albion Road

Across Old Albion Road
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

Susan Burnstine, Crossing West

Crossing West
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,100
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,600

 

 

                                         Absence of Being

 

Susan Burnstine, Beacon Hill 4:28pm

Beacon Hill 4:28pm
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,000
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,500

 

Susan Burnstine, Beacon Hill 4:28pm

Lake Union, 3:16pm
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,000
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,500

 

Susan Burnstine, Public Market Small Ferry

Public Market Small Ferry
Archival pigment ink print, varnished
12 x 12 inches, edition of 15: $1,000
16 x 16 inches, edition of 15: $1,500

 

 

Where Shadows Cease Artist Statment:

I have always dreamt in black and white. Until recently.   
 
The rare percentage of people who have been documented to dream in black and white were either born prior to the rise of color television or had no access to it.  And those exposed to color television dream in color.  I’m an anomaly.   I was born the year broadcast television transformed to “living color” and witnessed monochrome programs magically transform into reds, greens, yellows and blues. I was awestruck by the implausible appearance of these vivid hues, which became imbedded in my memory as the most perplexing and fantastic canvas of my childhood. What’s more, my family owned a television business and a Zenith Chromacolor TV blazed in every room of our home. Yet still, I viewed the world in black and white.   
 
My colorless reality was cemented at the age of four when I suffered a trauma that sparked years of severe night terrors. These debilitating nightmares dissipated in my teens, but as an adult returned following the tragic death of my mother. In attempt to cope with my loss, I replicated my unconscious monochrome visions on film using a collection of hand-made cameras and lenses that are frequently unpredictable and technically challenging. The cameras are primarily made out of plastic, vintage camera parts and random household objects and the single element lenses are molded out of plastic and rubber. Learning to overcome their extensive limitations has required me to rely on instinct and intuition – the same tools that are key when trusting in the unseen.  
 
In the wake of unimaginable events, a mirage of “living colors” has bled into my monochrome realm.  Have I surrendered to a distant truth? Escaped reality? Or both?  The answer lies deep within my dreams. 

 

 

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